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Showing posts from November, 2012

Hand Prints with School Paints

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Hand Printing Prints:
LEVEL: Pre-school and very Early Primary.

Colourful painted hands. This has to be one the most popular art projects for kids and it is also a great keepsake for parents and grandparents. You will need:
: Sheet of Paper
: Tempera Poster Paint
: Little Hands
: Shallow trays
: Plastic table top or cover a table with a plastic sheet.
: Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers – plus paper towels.
Let’s get started: This can get messy if you don’t have a bowl of water and paper towels prepared before you begin.

Put on the apron and prepare a surface area. Write the child’s name on the back of the paper before you begin

Pour paint into the shallow trays have one per colour. There are two ways to get the paint on to the hands.

1.Slowly dip the palm of the hands into the trays.
2.You paint the hands yourself with a brush.

Sometimes the dipping option can get too messy with drips and will give a sloppy looking print.The brush option will give you more control and a far better print. On…

Artist painting tip about colour

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COLOUR
by Ron Gribble

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Lets look at colour.

There is so much that can be said about it. We all know what colour is, but how do we mix it? How do we control it?

How do you decide what colour you want, and where?
How do we use complimentary colours?


After a demonstration that I did at the Downtown Hilton Art Gallery once, a chap said to me that he had observed that I spent 80% of my time mixing colours!!! That leaves only 20% for all the other things!! It seems to me that we should be devoting a similar proportion of time in research and practice for this activity.

I suggest that everyone should have a simple colour wheel beside their easel!! Go down to the hardware shop and pick one up. The colour wheel is very basic knowledge you could say. You left that behind at school, right?

Then why is it that I see a very bad lack of the use of the colour wheel in paintings?

Maybe, like me you did not fully realise the many ways that you can use complimenta…

Artist Paint Application and Personal Flair

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Application & Personality: By Ron Gribble


If you cannot do more than a photograph, then why take a photograph in the first place and save yourself a lot of time and agony!

This is to a large degree my personal opinion, but it is also the opinion of many top art judges who allocate points to what they call "application" and "flair".

In brief, how was the Paint or other medium applied? With confidence? Accurately but boldly? Can we see the artist's personality in the way he applies the medium? Does this application contribute to the over-all mood of the work?
Lets look at a portrait for example. Is it rendered with brush strokes that are bold and angular to depict movement, or youth, or vertical and horizontal to depict a more conservative subject?

I often see work that is very well done, but too photographic. The artist has used too little personal flair. This is a real problem when painting a portrait of a person or animal, that has to be absolutely accurate. …

String Painting Art with School Paints

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String Painting Art with School Paints

LEVEL: Pre-school and Primary.

This is a fun and simple way for kids’ to make colourful pictures. Every painting is completely unique and there is very little involved in the setup.Lots of fun…

There are two ways to do this see here for the other option.

You will need:
: Tempera Paint& Paint brush
: String cut in about 30cm (12”) lengths.
: Shallow Plates or trays
: Paper
: Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers – plus paper towels.
Let’s get started: Cover the table with newspaper.

Pour a little Tempera paint into the shallow trays. One colour only per tray. Dip the string into the Tempera Paint, leaving one end unpainted to hold on to.

Use your paint brush to push the string into the paint making sure it is well covered. Use your paint brush to push the string into the paint making sure it is well covered.

Lift the string and place it on your paper. Use the brush if you need to you need help position it without the brush touching the paper. Gently lif…

Under Painting Artist Lesson

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UNDER-PAINTING:
by Rob Gribble


I first prepared the board by applying an acrylic, warm, mid tone colour to cover the white board. This is a lot more helpful than the dead plain white of the canvas. Light is warm, so whatever I am painting, this warm colour will not fight against my efforts.
Once this is dry, apply what I call the TINT COLOUR. These pigments will be used in variations, throughout the painting.
THESE PIGMENTS ARE ULTRAMARINE BLUE, ALIZARINE CRIMSON, COERULEUM BLUE. (There are many spellings of this pigment).
I mixed these first in acrylic, as this will dry quickly, and be more stable as an under-painting. The patterns of colour that you will see (page 3) are random. I did allow the tint to be thicker where I intend to place the bluff and details however.
I am going to attempt to work through a complete painting from start to finish.I suggest that you read this whole demonstration through several times before you attempt to paint it on a 16x20 canvas panel. Now, the next…

Vegetable Prints school painting

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Vegetable Prints using tempera poster paint:

LEVEL: Pre-school and Primary. Use vegetables to create exciting prints on paper. Make fun random prints or combine them to create interesting images. Lots of fun…
You will need:
: Newspaper
: Sharpe Knife for teachers only to use.
: Raw vegetables like potatoes, carrots and corn on the cob.
: Tempera Poster Paint
: Shallow Plates or trays
: Paper
: Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers – plus paper towels.

Let’s get started: Cover the table with newspaper.

Teachers only: Use the knife to cut the vegetables with a flat surface showing. Try to make basic shapes like squares, stars or sometimes just cut the vegetables in half is interesting… Pour a thick layer of paint into a shallow tray or plate. Better to keep it as one colour per tray and one colour per vegetable shape.

Dip the flat side of the vegetables in the paint Press the painted side of the vegetables onto the paper for vegetable prints.

Allow to dry. TIPS:
-Try using a felt pen to add eyes, …

Bubble Painting with school paints

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School painting: Bubble Paint

LEVEL: Pre-school and very Early Primary.

Kids love bubble painting.It is so much fun and every one creates something different and unique. Key tip is to blow not suck through the straw. You will need:
: Paper
: Tempera Poster Paint
: Water
: Washing-up Liquid
: Spoon
: Straws
: Shallow trays
: Plastic table top or you can cover a table with a plastic sheet.
: Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers – plus paper towels.

Let’s get started: Before you start make sure that children understand they are to blow in the straw no sucking.

Mix together the paint and some washing up liquid. Whisk it up to make it frothy.
Start to add some water until it is the right consistency to blow bubbles. Spoon the frothy watery paint in the shallow tray.

Using a straw, blow into the bubble mixture until there are bubbles formed that are slightly higher than the shallow tray. Quickly place a piece of paper over the tray and bubbles.

When you remove the paper, there will be colourful …

School Paints Handprint fabric prints

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Handprint fabric prints on t-shirts:

LEVEL: Pre-school and Early Primary.

This activity is always popular as a meaningful take home artwork for kids to give to their parents and grandparents. They can be t-shirts, hats, towels or even pillow covers.

You will need:
: A solid colour cotton fabric to paint on.More basic the better.
: A permanent fabric ink or paint.FAS Fastex textile ink is ideal.
: Plastic table top or you can cover a table with a plastic sheet.
: Paint brushes or sponges and shallow trays
: Have plenty of water and old towels for a quick clean up.
: Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers – plus paper towels. Let’s get started:

Before you start be sure that children and clothing is well protected as this type of product is designed to stain clothing permanently. Pour a small amount of the fabric ink/paint into a shallow bowl or paper plate. Solid single bright colours are better than mixed colours.Colours can very quickly turn into a messy muddy puddle.

There are two popular w…