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Showing posts from 2013

Monster Paint Blob Faces

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Making Monster Paint Blob Faces is great fun for kids of all ages.   They are colourful, very simple to create and they look great displayed around the classroom.   LEVEL: Pre-school and Primary.  Monster Paint Blob Faces You will need: Tempera Poster Paint – in squeeze bottles is helpful Paper Marker Pen Drinking Straws Let’s get started: Squirt a nice small blob of paint on to the paper.   Thin the paint with a little water if necessary. If you do not have a squeeze bottle just use a spoon to spoon a small pool of paint. Using the drinking straw gently blow the paint around so it spreads out into an interesting monster-like blob shape.   Once dry, you can decorate your blobs with the marker pen or anything else you might find interesting like glitter or string for hair. TIPS:    -   Keep it to one colour. -    We painted small white circles for the eyes on each blob. -    Sprinkle the glitter onto the paint as it is nearl

Looking After Your School Paints:

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School paints that are designed for use with children can easily become contaminated with bacteria or mould, this also can lead to a very strong sickening odour. Some school paint I found for sale in a shop that was contaminated. The paint is seperated in the bottle. School Paint is very different to crayons and pencils as “all children’s liquid paint is an alive product” until it dries on your paper.   No matter what brand type or colour it will need some care to prolong its workable life. Just like canned food in the supermarket a preservative is added to a paint formulation to keep the paint in top condition.     As this type of paint often contains organic materials that can decay if not stored properly or if stored for a long period of time. School paints differ from house paint as it is used once for one project but using School Paints we are using the same paint day after day and again and again.    Extra care is needed to keep your products in good con

Colours & the colour wheel explained

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Using and reading the Colour Wheel: Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plus and Flipboard .   The colour wheel is a great guide used to understand the theory of colour and of mixing colours that go well together. So how does it work? Find the 3 Primary Colours - Red, yellow and blue on the wheel.   Notice how they are evenly split around the wheel. Find the colour directly in between any two primary colours on the wheel. E xample: Find - Yellow & Red the colour in between is Orange. This colour (orange) is made my mixing two primaries either side.   The same can be done with the other primary colours R ed & Blue = Violet Yellow & Blue = Green Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plus and Flipboard .

How to Teach Art to Children

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How to Teach Art to Children Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plus and Flipboard .   Kids love art and crafts from a very early age.   Art and craft is used in the classroom in so many ways – as part of learning to read, as a follow up on social studies lesson and of course an art lesson.   I found this simple and short video by waysandhow  that outlines some great basic ideas for art and craft in the classroom.   It’s worth watching as you never know you may pick up even just one basic tip that might help you. How to Teach Children Art Share and Enjoy Tony Parker www.schoolpaints.com www.faspaints.com Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plus and Flipboard . You might also like: Colours & the colour wheel explained What is Tempera Poster Paint?

Monoprinting for Kids with school paints

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LEVEL: Pre-school and Primary. This is quick, colourful and easy.   It is block printing at its simplest form using a Tempera Poster Paint with fingers and kids do love pushing paint around with their fingers. This week we had fun exploring colours with this simple printing technique by seeing what we could do with just one colour. Mono Printing for Kids with school paints You will need: : Sketch Paper : Tempera Paint in simple bold colours : Paint pots or dishes. : Printing plate: (old plastic placemat, styrofoam board, any flat non-porous surface). We used a small sheet of plexiglas.   You can use a wipe-able bench top. : Roller or a wide paint brush. : Apron and a cover sheet, newspapers or paper towels. Let’s get started: Monoprints are about a simple and quick one colour art form in that you cover a large area of the printing plate with a tempera paint . Your images are created by finger painting a basic design in the paint on the plate.   Then you

School Powder Paint sprinkles in the rain

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LEVEL: Pre-school and early primary. This is a great out door nature inspired painting project.   It’s always good to get outdoors and let the children talk about all the colours that they can see around them in the trees, grass and in the sky.   Using these colours to create artworks is ideal for learning colour mixing, squeezing (fine motor skills) and natural colours.   It is simple quick and colourful fun. You can use a small spray bottle filled with water to create your own rain on a sunny day. You will need: : Tempera Powder Paints. : Kitchen sieve. : Old spoons. : A small spray bottle filled with clean water. : Paper - heavier construction paper or cardboard works best here. : Water tub or tray. : Paper towels for clean-up. Get outdoors with colour Let’s get started: You can do this in the rain; but we found it cleaner and easier to create your own rain with a small spray bottle filled with water. Layout your sheets of paper inside the t

Wonky spider webs - feathering with thick school paint

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LEVEL: Pre-school and Primary. This is quick, colourful fun and easy.         Wonky Spider Webs [ Follow us on Facebook  and Pinterest  ] You will need: : Paper : Thicken Tempera Paint or a coloured PVA like 3D Craft Paint : Scraper or an anything plastic like an old plastic ruler. : Apron and a cover sheet or newspapers or paper towels. [ How to Thicken Tempera Paint ] Let’s get started: You can either outline with a pencil around a circular object to make a perfect circle or you can just do it by hand to make a wonky shape, like we did. It is easier to use a bottle with a nozzle cap for better control. We used a plastic ruler. Start from the outside and work inwards to keep the basic shape. Try not to use too many colours. When you have filled in the shape use a blunt straight edged object and drag from the inside to the outer edge.   We used a plastic ruler.   You will need to wipe clean your object making sure you have no

Marbling with school paints

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Marbling with school paints: By Sarah Bastida - Sarah's Blog: Paper Crafts for Children   From the Ideas for Art Book Series book    “Paint” Marbling usually involves oil based paints and turpentine. But m arbling with  Powder Paint is easy and more economical. Try it...  Marbling with school paints You will need Cooking oil Tempera Powder paints Dish and water Marbling usually involves oil based paints and turpentine. The end result is very effective, however the necessary materials are not usually close at hand and cleaning up can pose some problems. Marbling with  Powder Paint is easy and economical. Mix a small amount of cooking oil with some powder paint. A couple of tablespoonful's of mixture is enough. The proportions of oil to paint can be decided on and adjusted as the marbling takes place. Use a brush to shake drops of mixture onto the surface of the water in the tray. Gently stir the water to mingle the colours. Lay a pie

Artist Tip: What to Paint by Ron Gribble

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Subject Master: What to Paint By Ron Gribble So often I see people who are trying to learn how to paint and they choose to paint a portrait of their friend, son or daughter.   Often, it is their dog or cat that gets the treatment. I know that what one artist thinks is difficult, another will find easier, but I have never met one artist yet who has found the above subjects easy! Portrait of Norman Rockwell Painting the Soda Jerk Why are portraits so hard? Several reasons actually… 1.        Every one of us is an expert on the anatomy of humans and animals. We may not be able to recall and draw every detail, but if you get it slightly wrong even a young child knows there is something that doesn’t look right.   Eyes too small or one above the other, nose in the wrong place, relative to other details, mouth too big, not straight or ears in the wrong position.   A variation of a tiny fraction of a millimetre can make one eye to float above or below the othe

School Paints on Pinterest

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School Painting on Flipboard

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School Paints on Flipboard [ You can now follow School Paints in a magazine format on your iPad, iphone, Android or on Google Play on the amazing Flipboard app. [ Click Here ] Stay up-to-date : Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plus and Flipboard . Produced by www.FASpaints.com  

Frame your artwork with school paints

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Frame your artwork: If it is worth spending the time to paint something it is worth a few moments to create something to frame it.   This is more than often overlooked; it is a small thing that can highlight the mood by adding impact and spice to any artwork. Plus it does look great. You can paint a boarded frame before or after you have finished your painting.   But another popular idea for the classroom is to make a boarded frame on a larger piece of paper separately and add it to the completed painting later. This is what we have done here.   Frame your artwork with another larger sheet of paper. Tips: Paste sheets of colour paper on a larger board like we did with the clown painting. Use another sheet of paper to cover and protect your painting while you paint a frame. Frames can be simple yet very effective Share and Enjoy Tony Parker www.FASpaints.com www.schoolpaints.com Follow us on Pinterest , Facebook , Twitter , Goggle Plu